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If I want to go green, what size home should I build?

»Posted by on Apr 7, 2015 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

I see everything going green today:  companies, cars, coffee, and so on.  Though, when it comes to your home, what is your real motivation to go green?  Is it a concern for the environment?  As defined on the EPA’s website,http://www.epa.gov/greenbuilding/pubs/about.htm  – Green building is the practice of creating structures and using processes that are environmentally responsible and resource-efficient throughout a building’s life-cycle from siting to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation and deconstruction. “Green is money saved”, we say – but what about the environment?  In my opinion they go hand to hand.  As we continue to see new technology being utilized in Green building practices, I often think about how we do not know yet what the usage of it will add to emissions and/or what toxins are being added to the environment?  What type of waves do Z-waves really cause?  Any health risks?  The answer is NO, at least none that we know about yet.  This is life though, isn’t it?  We so often don’t know what harm things cause until later…  It has been this way since the beginning of time I am sure.  Unfortunately of course, we even sometimes ignore the warnings – such as those labeled right on the side of the item and we take the risk anyway! So, back to the point at hand, when someone asks me what size home to buy because they want to go green, I ask, “Do you really?”  The concept of green building isn’t new as our great-grandparents built climate-appropriate homes, mostly with materials right on the property!  Does ‘what’s old is new again’ sound familiar?  Today’s green homes integrate not only climatic thinking but are resource and energy efficient, safer for occupants, and often much less expensive to maintain.  Most of all a lot smaller than we’ve gotten used to building.  Most new homes never need much of what we have been installing that requires a power source (even when we are not using it)! So what does go into a green home?  Some key components of a green home include: 1.  Energy-efficient features:  appliances, windows, water/heating systems, light bulbs; 2.  Water-efficient features: showerheads, faucets, toilets, dishwashers, washing machines, irrigation systems, rainwater collection system, wastewater treatment systems, hot water circulation systems; 3.  Resource-efficient features: home orientation on lot, floor plan layout, natural light design, wood species such as bamboo, recycled materials in carpets, tiles, concrete; 4.  Indoor Air Quality features: The heating, air conditioning and ventilation system (HVAC) must be properly sized for an accurate and properly ventilated home.  Using fans inside will cycle fresh air and release stale air.  Low-VOC paints and finishes and wallpapers should be used as well.  If you are unfamiliar with Low-VOC material, you may reference this site for more information http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/construction/materials/low-voc-paint.htm ; 5.  Outside the Home features: take care in preserving trees and other vegetation, proper plant selections for climate (Rhody Natives are a great choice, here’s their site to reference http://rinhs.org/who-we-are-what-we-do/programs-projects/rhody-native-home/ ) and watered as needed, driveways and other impervious surfaces should be reduced – use gravel, pavers, other permeable systems. Bottom line – going green is not only a decision that needs to be made by the consumer, but the homebuilder must have a clear understanding of the homeowner’s desires, budget and expectations as well.  These are the many “shades of green” and spending the time together (contractor and homeowner) without being rushed along in the process will ultimately accomplish an environmentally friendly, safe, and cost efficient...

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»Posted by on Mar 23, 2015 in Testimonials | 0 comments

“Thanks again for being available on such short notice and for providing such a comprehensive report and proposal. Although I very much hope that this deal will come together, even if this property doesn’t work out for us, we now have an excellent general contractor resource in yourself in RI in regard to other possibilities. Relationships are everything and I know and feel that we have an excellent resource in and relationship with you. We’ll be doing some business together, one way or another, I’m sure.” – Dan D.

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Do you know if your house has holes?

»Posted by on Mar 19, 2015 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

You better find out if you want to sell your house in the near future.  Sounds strange huh?  Well it’s not just going to happen – it already is!  Get familiar with the term “blower door test”.  This test will be performed by a certified company/individual that will analyze the “escape” of cool/hot air – they use this test to rate how well your house is sealed.  The good news is that these tests are being conducted and mainly viewed for training purposes only and will not be marked by either a realtor or building official to have it corrected!   Important to know though – this test applies to any contractors that work on your house or build a new one, as they will be required to show a report for a final inspection related to efficiency.  If it fails, they will have to correct it for you.  For example, a test (for ratings) will be required prior to work being done on an existing home that will be adding an addition, then again after the work is completed to track the difference in escape rates.  On a plus side, since we’re all becoming more efficient, THIS WILL HELP THE REALTOR WITH SALES.  The houses that score higher and use less energy are naturally more appealing.  However, those that fail will be required and submitted for correction and improvement. Now you’re probably wondering what is this test and how does it work?  A “blower door test” consists of removal of the interior front door then mounting a powerful fan into the frame of the exterior door. When turned on, the fan pulls air out of the house, lowering the air pressure inside. The higher outside air pressure then flows in through all unsealed cracks, holes and openings. The certified auditors may use a smoke pencil to detect air leaks and infrared glasses. These tests determine the air infiltration rate of a building.  If you would like to learn more about what’s coming our way, visit: http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/blower-door-tests Craig DiPetrillo, President of DiPetrillo Properties & DP Student Rentals, is a FORTIFIED Home™ certified evaluator.    DiPetrillo Properties offers all clients the same time and effort in pre-determining the return on their project as they do for their own projects.  Whether it is a personal or business claim, their team understands the process from point of concept to design; from business plan to finance; and all the way to construction. They will help you get the money you deserve for the claim so you can move forward with fixing your property and returning to normal life. DiPetrillo Properties also offers full in-house construction services for both residential and commercial projects. They work on both new construction and renovation projects to help clients see any investment become a reality.   For more information please e-mail or call: info@dipetrilloproperties.com/401.232-7552...

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Claims Evaluator…Got one?

»Posted by on Mar 12, 2015 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

Is your insurance company’s offer less than you need to cover your losses? Maybe it’s time to get your own evaluation? Did you know that there is someone out there that can help you with the confusing claims documentation and get you the money you deserve?  This is a niche specialty and there aren’t many people that can navigate the language and fight for you.  The job requires unique qualifications and an acute attention to detail…the itemized forms require a breadth and depth of knowledge and expertise and the price breakdown language is often overwhelming to not just the property owner but also to most contractors and professionals in the construction industry! Just take a look at this example below! It offers just one small piece of what this multi-page document looks like: When you begin making your insurance claim, the process seems simple enough. You call your insurance company and they send an adjuster out to take an inventory of the loss.  After that, you receive a detailed report from the insurance company outlining the work that needs to be done, and what they say it should cost.  This is the moment where you decide if you want to negotiate the amount offered to you or if you just want to move forward and sign it. It is at this time you should contact someone to look over the report.  This is where Craig DiPetrillo steps in. He can then assess whether or not you are potentially entitled to more than your insurance company is offering! Craig, has experience in the industry and will understand your contract and the company’s responsibilities right down to the fine print.  He will work to get you the money you truly need, not just what the insurance company says you should get. To help make the decision to work with Craig even easier, it only costs you a small percentage of the EXTRA money he is able to negotiate on your behalf. If had can’t increase the claim (a very rare occurrence) they don’t pay at all! As an example: A claim payout by your insurance company is OFFERED (not settled and agreed to by you at this point or signed off on in any way) in the amount of $50,000.00.  Craig is requested to review the claim by you. Craig finds that they can raise the your claim offer of settlement to $65,000.00; which could be by way of error by the adjuster or inaccurate data input. From there, Craig is paid 15{48370f4c7e8d05e54649e612d3c42fc7fd435ea0d0341dced4441d5061938337} of the raised portion (only 15{48370f4c7e8d05e54649e612d3c42fc7fd435ea0d0341dced4441d5061938337} of the $15,000.00). If he is not successful in finding an increased opportunity in the settlement offered to you by the insurance company, he is not paid at all. Utilizing a private evaluator ensures that someone is working on your behalf versus someone working on behalf of the insurance company. Craig DiPetrillo, President of DiPetrillo Properties & DP Student Rentals, is a FORTIFIED Home™ certified evaluator.    DiPetrillo Properties offers all clients the same time and effort in pre-determining the return on their project as they do for their own projects.  Whether it is a personal or business claim, their team understands the process from point of concept to design; from business plan to finance; and all the way to construction. They will help you get the money you deserve for the claim so you can move forward with fixing your property and returning to normal life.  DiPetrillo Properties also offers full in-house construction services for both residential and commercial projects. They work on both new construction and renovation projects to help clients see any investment become a reality.   For more information please e-mail or call: info@dipetrilloproperties.com/401.232-7552...

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Thawing Ice Dams & Snow Covered Roofs = Potential Damage!

»Posted by on Mar 5, 2015 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

Icy gutters and snow packed high on roofs that are slowly starting to thaw…whats next? Warming temps create disaster if followed by a freeze! Do not break the ice from the gutters when solid. An old method that I myself have used to help with the thawing – add salt to panty hose then lay it across the back of the gutter closest to the roof shingles to assist the thawing and create space. After separating the two (gutter from roof shingles), move the panty hose to the top of the gutter to thaw downward. When you feel the ice is soft enough slowly break apart without adding force to the hangers or gutter. IF it breaks loose go ahead and remove it but if it doesn’t STOP and let it thaw on its own. You already broke the ice dam apart (roof from gutter) which is most important. If snow remains on the roof it will potentially fill the gap again so you may want top have that removed by a professional first? As I’m sure you already know – if you do not climb roofs regularly, do not attempt any of this on your own, it can be a hazard. To safely remove snow from roofs, the Office of the Governor, RIEMA, HEALTH and OSHA recommend the following tips: Tips for Residents: •Hire a professional. Licensed and insured roof contractors are the best source of professional snow removers. • For roof snow removal, use a snow rake with a long extension arm that will allow you to remove the snow while standing on the ground. Snow rakes are available at most hardware stores. • Don’t use a roof rake while on a ladder and don’t attempt to scale your roof to remove snow. • If you must use a ladder, make certain that the base is securely anchored. • Roof drainage systems should be kept clear to minimize the risk of future roof ponding in the event of subsequent heavy snow melting. This is especially important for flat roofs. • Make certain not to contact electrical wires. • Don’t attempt to clear snow from your roof during periods of strong winds. • Snow removal equipment meant for pavement should never be used on the roof since they can damage the roof cover system. • When using products, such as ROOFMELT, read all manufacturer’s warnings and product safety information carefully. These products can be harmful to skin and eyes if used incorrectly. • “When in doubt, stay out, and evaluate” *If you feel that your roof is in danger of collapsing, get out of your house and contact your local building commissioner or a roof contractor. Tips from OSHA for Businesses: • When possible, use snow removal methods that do not involve workers going on roofs. • Evaluate loads exerted on the roof or structure (e.g., total weight of snow, workers and equipment used), compared to the load limit of the roof. • Require that workers use fall-protection equipment. • Ensure that workers use ladders and aerial lifts safely. • OSHA standards require employers to evaluate hazards and protect workers from falls when working at heights of four feet or more above a lower level or 6 feet or more for construction work. • For more detailed information on safely removing snow from rooftops and other elevated surfaces, please see information available at: http://www.osha.gov How to Recognize Signs of a Potential Roof Collapse: • Sagging roofs • Severe roof leaks • Cracked or split wood members • Bends or ripples in supports • Cracks in walls or masonry • Sheared off screws from steel frames • Sprinkler heads that have dropped down below ceiling tiles • Doors that pop open • Doors or windows that are difficult to open • Bowed utility pipes or conduit attached at ceiling • Creaking, cracking or popping sounds. In addition, remember to shovel out nearby fire hydrants and storm drains and please offer to assist elderly family and neighbors with shoveling and snow removal. The elderly or those with functional needs seeking assistance with shoveling should contact Serve Rhode Island at (401) 331-2298. Please note that Serve RI will not assist with removing snow from roofs. DiPetrillo Properties – Planning, Investments, Construction...

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